StarMed clinical evidence

Published studies on the StarMed range of CPAP and NIV respiratory hoods. For more information on the full StarMed range, including information sheets, videos and enquiries, please visit https://www.intersurgical.com/info/starmed

Noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure ventilation using a new helmet interface: a case control prospective pilot study

Tonnelier JM, Prat G, Nowak E, Goetghebeur D, Renault A, Boles JM, L'her E. Intensive Care Med. 2003 Nov;29(11):2077-80

Prospective pilot study on 11 adult patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, treated with helmet CPAP, matched with 11 control patients treated with standard face mask. Primary end points were improvements of gas exchanges and clinical parameters of respiratory distress. Authors conclude the helmet is an 'efficient alternative' to face mask treatment 'even in cases of severe respiratory acidosis and hypercapnia'.

Link to abstract.

Non-invasive ventilation delivered by conventional interfaces and helmet in the emergency department

Pelosi P, Severgnini P, Aspesi M, Gamberoni C, Chiumello D, Fachinetti C, Introzzi L, Antonelli M, Chiaranda M. Eur J Emerg Med. 2003 Jun;10(2):79-86.

Early review of the use of NIV and the helmet interface in the emergency department and in the pre-hospital setting. Authors concluded that the helmet 'can extend the application of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in different categories of patients with respiratory failure'.

Link to abstract.

New treatment of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure: Noninvasive pressure support ventilation delivered by helmet - A pilot controlled trial

Antonelli M, Conti G, Pelosi P, Gregoretti C, Pennisi MA, Costa R, Severgnini P, Chiaranda M, Proietti R. Crit Care Med. 2002 Mar;30(3):602-8

Prospective clinical pilot investigation on 33 patients treated with noninvasive pressure support ventilation (NPSV) delivered by helmet. Each patient was matched with two controls with ARF treated with NPSV via a facial mask. Primary end points were improvement of gas exchange, need for endotracheal intubation and the complications related to NPSV. Both groups improved oxygenation after NPSV, less patients failed NPSV and were intubated in the helmet group and less complications occured, while longer continuous application of the tecnique was possible. Authors concluded that NPSV by helmet successfully treated hypoxemic ARF, with better tolerance and fewer complications than facial mask NPSV.

Link to abstract.