StarMed clinical evidence

Published studies on the StarMed range of CPAP and NIV respiratory hoods. For more information on the full StarMed range, including information sheets, videos and enquiries, please visit https://www.intersurgical.com/info/starmed

A multiple-center survey on the use in clinical practice of noninvasive ventilation as a first-line intervention for acute respiratory distress syndrome

Antonelli M, Conti G, Esquinas A, Montini L, Maggiore SM, Bello G, Rocco M, Maviglia R, Pennisi MA, Gonzalez-Diaz G, Meduri GU. Crit Care Med. 2007 Jan;35(1):18-25

Prospective multi-centre cohort study across three European intensive care units with NPPV expertise, resulted in survey of 479 patients with ARDS. Authors conclude NPPV applied as first-line intervention avoided intubation in 54% of treated patients.

Link to abstract.

Noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure delivered by helmet in hematological malignancy patients with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure

Principi T, Pantanetti S, Catani F, Elisei D, Gabbanelli V, Pelaia P, Leoni P. Intensive Care Med. 2004 Jan;30(1):147-50 

Comparison study of nCPAP through helmet vs face mask on 17 patients with moderate to severe acute respiratory failure. Arterial oxygen saturation, heart rate, respiratory rate and blood pressure were measured. Authors conclude early nCPAP with helmet imrpoves oxygentation in this scenario.

Link to abstract.

New treatment of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure: Noninvasive pressure support ventilation delivered by helmet - A pilot controlled trial

Antonelli M, Conti G, Pelosi P, Gregoretti C, Pennisi MA, Costa R, Severgnini P, Chiaranda M, Proietti R. Crit Care Med. 2002 Mar;30(3):602-8

Prospective clinical pilot investigation on 33 patients treated with noninvasive pressure support ventilation (NPSV) delivered by helmet. Each patient was matched with two controls with ARF treated with NPSV via a facial mask. Primary end points were improvement of gas exchange, need for endotracheal intubation and the complications related to NPSV. Both groups improved oxygenation after NPSV, less patients failed NPSV and were intubated in the helmet group and less complications occured, while longer continuous application of the tecnique was possible. Authors concluded that NPSV by helmet successfully treated hypoxemic ARF, with better tolerance and fewer complications than facial mask NPSV.

Link to abstract.