StarMed clinical evidence

Published studies on the StarMed range of CPAP and NIV respiratory hoods. For more information on the full StarMed range, including information sheets, videos and enquiries, please visit https://www.intersurgical.com/info/starmed

Helmet CPAP versus Oxygen Therapy in Hypoxemic Acute Respiratory Failure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

Yuwen Luo, Yan Luo, Yun Li, Luqian Zhou, Zhe Zhu, Yitai Chen, Yuxia Huang, and Xin Chen. Yonsei Med J. 2016 Jul 1; 57(4): 936–941.

This meta-analysis aimed to investigate the effects of helmet CPAP on gas exchange, mortality, intubation rate and in-hospital mortality rate in comparison with the conventional oxygen therapy (COT). Data obtained from four studies and 377 subjects with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure (hARF) showed that helmet CPAP significantly increased the PaO2/FiO2, and reduced the arterial carbon dioxide levels, intubation rate and in-hospital mortality rates as compared to COT therapy. These results suggest that the helmet improves oxygenation, reduces mortality and intubation rates. However, large randomised controlled trials are needed to validate these findings.

Link to abstract.

Helmet CPAP vs. oxygen therapy in severe hypoxemic respiratory failure due to pneumonia

Brambilla AM, Aliberti S, Prina E, Nicoli F, Forno MD, Nava S, Ferrari G, Corradi F, Pelosi P, Bignamini A, Tarsia P, Cosentini R. Intensive Care Med. 2014 Jul;40(7):942-9

Multi-centre, randomised controlled trial across four Italian centres. Patients split into helmet CPAP and Venturi mask groups. Primary end point was percentage of patients meeting criteria for ETI. Authors conclude helmet CPAP reduces the risk of meeting ETI criteria in this scenario.

Link to abstract.

Out-of-hospital helmet CPAP in acute respiratory failure reduces mortality: a study led by nurses

Garuti G, Bandiera G, Cattaruzza MS, Gelati L, Osborn JF, Toscani S, Confalonieri M, Lusuardi M.
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis. 2010 Dec;73(4):145-51

Prospective observational study investigating effect of CPAP prior to admission to emergency room, on reduction of endotracheal intubation, in-hospital mortality and length of stay. Results showed that mortality was reduced when helmet CPAP was applied both in the pre-hospital and in-hospital settings. Authors conclude that using CPAP by trained nurses is 'safe, reduces mortality and hospital length of stay'.

Link to abstract.

Is the helmet CPAP first line pre-hospital treatment of presumed severe acute pulmonary edema?

Foti G, Sangalli F, Berra L, Sironi S, Cazzaniga M, Rossi GP, Bellani G, Pesenti A. Intensive Care Med. 2009 Apr;35(4):656-62

Comparison of application of CPAP by helmet in combination to medical therapy or used as a stand-alone procedure. In 62 patients split across the two groups, CPAP significantly improved oxygenation, reduced respiratory rate and improved hemodynamics. Based on results, authors propose 'helmet CPAP as first line pre-hospital treatment of presumed severe ACPE'.

Link to abstract.

Noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure delivered by helmet in hematological malignancy patients with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure

Principi T, Pantanetti S, Catani F, Elisei D, Gabbanelli V, Pelaia P, Leoni P. Intensive Care Med. 2004 Jan;30(1):147-50 

Comparison study of nCPAP through helmet vs face mask on 17 patients with moderate to severe acute respiratory failure. Arterial oxygen saturation, heart rate, respiratory rate and blood pressure were measured. Authors conclude early nCPAP with helmet imrpoves oxygentation in this scenario.

Link to abstract.